Are you a hypocrite?

Yeah, me too.  All of us fall into the hypocrite category because we say one thing and do another. Scott Sauls has an excellent chapter in Jesus Outside the Lines on this topic.  Here are some of my favorite quotes from the chapter:
It reminds me that God's relentless grip on me, not my relentless grip on God, keeps me in his love.
Shouldn't we evaluate Jesus on his own merits rather than the flaws of his followers?
There is something incredibly attractive and inviting about people who stop pointing fingers and posing and pretending to be totally good and totally right, and instead start taking themselves less seriously and openly and freely admit that they are not yet what they should be.
The Bible helps us see how: it is the loveliness of Jesus, and only the loveliness of Jesus, that can make hypocrites lovely.
Humbled by our own hypocrisy and drawn to how the loveliness of Jesus can transform us, we must preoccupy ourselves less with trying to be like him and more with simply being with him...because the closer we are to Jesus, the more we yield and surrender to the light he has already put in us by his Spirit and the further we will be from selfishness and sin.
Loveliness, or holiness, or the fruit of the Spirit, or whatever we are going to call it, will not grow in us when we seek it directly. It is not fruit we should be seeking; it is Jesus. Loveliness and holiness and fruit will not grow when we try to make them grow. Rather, these will grow as by-products of being in the presence of, considering the excellencies of, and marinating in the trust and beauty of the one who loves us and gave himself for us and in whom there is never a shred of hypocrisy. 
 
 
 
 

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